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Final Exam Study Guide
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Final Study Guide #2

Ch. 27
Militarism – The late 1800s saw a rise in militarism, the glorification of the military. Under militarism, the armed forces and readiness for war came to dominate national policy

Ultimatum - A final set of demands; to avoid war, Serbia must end all anti-Austrian agitation and punish any Serbian official involved in the murder plot.

Mobilize – To prepare for war; the Russians did so when Austria refused to soften its punishment on Serbia. Germany declared war on Russia in response.

Neutrality – A policy of supporting neither side in a war. Italy and Britain remained uncommitted in the first part of the war.

Total war – Total war is the channeling of a nation’s entire resources into a war effort. Both sides set up systems to recruit, arm, transport, and supply armies that numbered in the millions.

Propaganda – Propaganda is the spreading of ideas to promote a cause or damage an opposing cause. The Germans and British government gave a sense of nationalism to its people to fight.

Atrocity – Atrocity is horrible acts against innocent people. Allied propaganda circulated tales of these happenings in the press to discourage the enemies.

Armistice – Armistice is an agreement to end fighting. The new German government sought out peace with the Allies and the Great War came to an end at 11 A.M. on Nov. 11, 1918.

Reparations – Reparations are payments for war damages. The Allies insisted the Central Powers pay for damages, but they argued that the armistice was a cease fire rather than surrendering.

Mandate – Mandate is territories that were administered by western powers. Britain and France gained mandates over German colonies in Africa and Ottoman lands in the Middle East.

Edith Cavell – She British nurse worked in the Red Cross hospital in Belgium after the German invasion. When Germany soldiers discovered that she was helping allied prisoners escape.

Georges Clemenceau – The French leader, nicknamed “the Tiger” for his fierce war policy. His chief goal was to weaken Germany so that it could never again threaten France.

Alfred Nobel – He was the Swedish inventor of dynamite. He also set up the Nobel Peace Prize to reward each year the individual whose work advanced the cause of peace.

Gavrillo Princip – A member of the Unity or Death terrorist group, he was the one who shot and killed the archduke of Austria.

Sarajevo – Sarajevo was the capital of Bosnia, which was on the boarder of Hungary.

Woodrow Wilson – Wilson was the 28th president of the United States, he declared war when the Germans destroyed a U.S. cruise ship that was carrying a couple hundred Americans aboard.

Wilson's Fourteen Points – A plan of a "peace without victory" most completely explained in his "Fourteen Points" speech before Congress on 8 January 1918; included in the lists were an end to secret treaties, freedom of the seas, free trade, and a large-scale reduction of arms.

Francis Ferdinand - On June 28, 1914, while traveling in a motorcade through Sarajevo, Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his wife Sophie were assassinated by a Serbian nationalist.

Kaiser William II - Kaiser William II was willing to preserve the triple alliance. He also allowed Bismarck’s reinsurance treaty, which was made with Russia in 1887, it crumbled, letting Russia seek new allies.

Bertha Von Sutner – An Austrian author that wrote the antiwar novel Lay Down Your Arms. It called for Austrian peace and she received a Nobel Peace Prize.

Triple Alliance - The triple-alliance was made up of Germany, Austria-Hungary and Italy. Also known as the Central Powers.

Ottoman Empire - the Ottoman Empire joined powers in with the central powers in 1914. They were able to close off allied ships from the black sea which was a crucial link.

Trench warfare – On the Western Front, both sides of the war made trenches that spanned for miles, life in the trenches were hard and unforgiving.

Machine gun – Machine guns made it possible for a few gunners to mow down waves of soldiers. This helped to create stalemates by making it hard to advance.

Airplane – Airplanes were first used as scouts but as technology advanced the planes began having machine guns strapped on.

Role of women in WWI – Women took over the jobs that the men had before the war, they also were military nurses, many served on the front lines.

Nationalism – Nationalism played a crucial role in starting the war. Pass tensions, fear, and pride all help spark the war.

Paris Peace Conference – The Paris Peace Conference offered one beacon of hope in the League of Nations, the meetings helped bring peace to the tension filled nations.

American neutrality – America wanted to remain neutral but German U-boats were destroying U.S. cruise ships and that sparked hated and distrust.

Black Hand - he Black Hand is a terrorist group that wished to kill the Archduke of Austria, Gavrilo Principe was the one who assassinated the royal king and queen.

Treaty of Versailles - The Allied peacemakers summoned representatives of the new German republic to the palace of Versailles outside Paris the Germans were ordered to sign the treaty.

Self determination – One of Wilson’s fourteen points, he believed through self determination and democracy will raise expectations for a just and lasting peace.

Shleiffen Plan – He planed to destroy the Russians on the Eastern Front first then fight off the other Allies on the Western Front.

U boat – U boats were German submarines that attacked allied naval and shipping boats. Its attacks also helped bring the U.S. into war.

Lusitania - The Lusitania was a ship that was sunk by a German U-boat, killing American citizens on board. Wilson declared war on the Central powers after this incident.

Armistice – Armistice is an agreement to end fighting. The new German government sought out peace with the Allies and the Great War came to an end at 11 A.M. on Nov. 11, 1918.

Mandate - An authoritative command or instruction. The Allies made a list of payments for the Central Powers to repay.

War reparations - War reparations were payments for war damage. In the treaty of Versailles Germany was blamed as the scapegoat and had to repay Europe nearly 30 billion dollars.

Western front – The Western Front was the side of Germany that faced Britain and France. The trench filled lands proved hard to fight on.

Eastern front – The Eastern Front was the side of Germany that faced Russia; because Russia was the least modernized nation, they lost many lives.

Verdun - The Battle of Verdun is considered the greatest and lengthiest in world history. Never before or since has there been such a lengthy battle.

Battle of Marne - The Allies counterattacked against the German forces, with little success. The Germans then attacked the French lines, but their attack failed.

CH. 28
Soviet – Soviets were councils of workers and soldiers. At first, the soviets worked democratically within the government, but were later turned into a dictatorship.

Command economy – The Soviet Union developed a command economy, in which government officials made all basic economic decisions. This occurred during Stain’s five year plan.

Collective – Stalin forced peasants to give up their private plots and live on either state-owned farms or on collectives, which were large farms owned and operated by peasants as a group.

Kulak – Stalin sought to destroy the kulaks, or wealthy peasants. The government confiscated kulaks’ land and sent them to labor camps.

Totalitarian state – Stalin turned the Soviet Union into a totalitarian state. In this form of government, a one-party dictatorship attempts to regulate every aspect of the lives of its citizens.

Socialist realism – Stalin forced artist and writers to conform to a style called social realism. Its goal was to boost socialism by showing Soviet life in a positive life.

Lenin – Ilyich Ulyanov was a revolutionist who changed Russia into a dictatorship government. He called for an elite group to lead the revolution and set up a “dictatorship of the proletariat.”

Osip Mandelstam – A Jewish poet, who was imprisoned, tortured, and exiled for composing a satirical verse about Stalin.

Nicholas II – Nicholas II was the Russian czar during WWI and he had failed to solve Russia’s basic problems. He was later overthrown and was replaced with a Communist nation.

Gregory Rasputin – An illiterate Siberian peasant, who claimed to be holy. He gave advice to the czarina, Alexandra, and he corrupted the Russian government; everybody but the czarina saw his evil.

Joseph Stalin – Gained power in 1924 after the death of Lenin. In the 1920s, he became the general secretary of the Bolshevik party and put his people in top spots to isolate Trotsky.

Stalin's 5 Year Plan – Stalin wanted Russia to become an industrial power. He aimed at building heavy industry, improving transportation, and increasing farm output to achieve staggering economic heights.

Socialist realism – Stalin forced artists and writers to conform to a style called socialist realism. Its goal was to boost socialism by showing Soviet life in a positive view.
Totalitarian state – A one party dictatorship attempts to regulate every aspects of the lives of its citizens.

Anna Akhmatova – One of Russia’s greatest poets, fell out of favor because her poetry did not stress communist ideas.

V.I. Lenin - Ilyich Ulyanov was a revolutionist who changed Russia into a dictatorship government. He called for an elite group to lead the revolution and set up a “dictatorship of the proletariat.”

Mikhail Sholokhov – The author of And Quiet Flows the Don, his book passed the censorship law and he later won a Nobel Prize for literature.

Joseph Stalin - Gained power in 1924 after the death of Lenin. In the 1920s, he became the general secretary of the Bolshevik party and put his people in top spots to isolate Trotsky.

Leon Trotsky – A brilliant Marxist thinker and an architect of the Bolshevik Revolution. He was a contender for the leadership of Russia.

Socialist revolution – Soviets worked in the government but later turned into the Bolsheviks and took total charge of the government.

Bolshevik Revolution – The Bolsheviks were a radical group that worked to take control of the government and the czars, changing it into a communist government.

Lenin's New Economic Policy – NEP, or New Economic Policy, allowed some capitalist ventures. While the state kept control of banks, foreign trade, and large industries, small businesses were allowed to reopen for profit after being shutdown due to “war communism.”

Stalin - Gained power in 1924 after the death of Lenin. In the 1920s, he became the general secretary of the Bolshevik party and put his people in top spots to isolate Trotsky.

Stalin's 5 Year Plan – Stalin wanted Russia to become an industrial power. He aimed at building heavy industry, improving transportation, and increasing farm output to achieve staggering economic heights.

The arts under Stalin –Stalin forced artists and writers to conform to a style called socialist realism. Its goal was to boost socialism by showing Soviet life in a positive view.

List three causes of the 1917 revolution in Russia - The revolution of 1917 was due to the disasters on the battlefield, immense lack of food, and shortages of fuels.

Ch. 29
Apartheid - Between 1910 and 1940, whites strengthened their grip on South Africa. They imposed a system of racial segregation to ensure white economic power.

Civil disobedience – Gandhi used the works of Henry David Thoreau, an American philosopher of the 1800s who believed civil disobedience, or the refusal to obey unjust laws.

Diego Rivera – A young Spanish painter who studied in different types of paintings in Europe. He added a bold new style that drew on Mexican folk art.

Hirohito – Hirohito was a Japanese emperor who reigned from 1926 to 1989. He led Japan on a militaristic and expansionist path that would eventually engulf all of Asia.

Jiang Jieshi – He took over the Guomindang after Sun’s death in 1925. In 1926, he began a march into northern China, crushing warlords and Chinese Communist parties.

Muhammad Ali Jinrah - During the 1930’s, the Muslim League gained an able leader in this man; like Gandhi, he came from a middle class background and had studied law in England.

Nationalization – Nationalization permitted the breakup of large estates, placed restrictions on foreigners owning land, and allowed nationalization, which is also known as the government invasion of natural resources.

Pancho Villa – He lead the attack and killed seventeen Americans in New Mexico, and even though the United States felt justified in these actions, it encouraged violent anti-Yankee attitudes in Latin America.

Cause of the 1910 Mexico Revolution – Peasants wanted land, workers and miners wanted more high wages, and middle class liberals wanted a democracy instead of the Diaz dictatorship.

Pan-Africanism - A movement that was started in the 1920’s. Pan-Africanism emphasized the unity of Africans and people of Africans and people of African descent around the world.

Mandate System (M. East) - Territories administered by European nations, set up by the Paris Peace Conference outraged Arabs because they were promised independence after WWII.

Great Salt March - Gandhi offered a bold defiance towards Britain in 1930. He and 78 other followers marched 240 miles to the Red Sea in hopes to end the British salt domination.

May Fourth Movement - The May Fourth Movement was an attempt of China to end foreign domination in hopes to adopting western ideas and traditions.

Effect of Great Depression in Japan - Japan's economy was distressed by the effects of the Great Depression and this created a hunger for expansion and in increase in military.

CH. 30
General strike - A strike held by many different types of workers all at once. In 1926, 3 million workers in Britain were a part of a general strike, it lasted for 9 days.

Stream of consciousness – In this type of technique, a writer probes a character’s random thoughts and feelings without imposing any logic or order.

Flapper – The reigning queen of the Jazz Age was the liberated young woman called the flapper. The first flappers were American, but European sisters soon adopted the fashion.

Concentration camp – Tens of thousands of Jews were sent to concentration camps, detention centers for civilians considered enemies of a state.

Leon Blum – In 1936, several parties on the left united behind the socialist leader Leon Blum. His popular Front government tried to solve labor problems and passed some social legislation.

Marie Curie - A Polish-born French scientist, she experimented with radioactivity. She discovered that radioactivity was able to change one element into another, and thus proving that atoms are neither solid nor indivisible.

Franklin D. Roosevelt - Franklin D. Roosevelt was the president of the United States in 1932. He was the creator of the New Deal, a massive group of economic and social programs.

Virginia Woolf – She was a British writer who experimented with a technique called steam of consciousness to explore the hidden thoughts of people as they go through the ordinary actions of their everyday life.

Albert Einstein – By 1905, the German-born physicist Albert Einstein advanced his theories or relativity.

James Joyce – An Irish novelist who explored the mind of a hero who remains sound asleep throughout the novel, Finnegan’s Wake.

Pablo Picasso - He was a Spanish artist, who originally drew realistic paintings. Then in later years, he began to experiment with different styles and became the creator of the cubism.

Joseph Pilsudski – By 1926, He had become dictator if Poland and like Hitler, he promised order and won the backing of the military and wealthy.

Frank Lloyd Wright – The American architect Frank Lloyd Wright reflected the Bauhaus beliefs that the function of a building should determine its form.

Kellog-Briand Pact – Almost every independent nation in the world signed onto this agreement, promising to “renounce war as an instrument of nation policy.”

Fascism – Mussolini coined the term, but fascists had no single unifying set of beliefs, as Marxists did. The term is used to describe any authoritarian government that is not communist.

Adolph Hitler - Adolph Hitler was the leader of the Nazi party and the dictator of Germany. His goal was to eliminate all sub-Aryan race.

Totalitarian rule - Totalitarian rule is rule under a one-party dictatorship. Communism and fascism are the most common type of government; Hitler was a dictator of a communism government.

Mein Kampf - Mein Kampf was the name of the book that Adolph Hitler wrote while he was in prison. The title translates to "My Struggle," and it told about Hitler's anti-Semitic outlooks.

Campaign against the Jews - Hitler used the Jews as a scapegoat so he could gain support of Germany after the lost in WWI. Hitler’s goal was to exterminate all the Jews and sub-Aryan race.

Great Depression – The Great Depression was a major economic downfall that affected the entire world. A single stock market crash in the U.S. was blamed for the disaster.

Mussolini – The son of socialist blacksmith and devoutly religious schooling teacher, and he organized veterans and other discontented Italians into the Fascist party in 1919.

Weimar Republic – The German democratic government created after WWI, the constitution set up a parliamentary form of government led by a prime minister.

Kristallnacht - Kristallnacht is translated into “the night of broken glass.” It was a massive riot in the night where Nazi-led mobs attacked Jews.

List causes of Great Depression – Crash of the stock market and mass production of goods selling at a high price.

CH. 31
Appeasement – The western democracies denounced Hitler’s moves and adopted a policy of appeasement, giving in to the demands of an aggressor in order to keep the peace.

Blitzkrieg – In September 1939, Nazi forces stormed into Poland, revealing the enormous powers of Hitler’s blitzkrieg, or “lighting war.” The raids targeted factories, towns, and cities.

Cold war –An ideological war between the U.S. and the USSR, the U.S. wanted to spread democracy to the world and the USSR wanted to spread communism.

Collaborator – People who were helping the Nazis hunt down the Jews or, like the Vichy government in France, shipping tens of thousands of Jews to their deaths were called collaborators

Containment – The Truman Doctrine was rooted in the idea of containment, limiting communism to the areas already under Soviet control.

Genocide – An elimination of a certain race or group, the Jews were targeted in Nazi Germany and were sent to concentration camps.

Kamikaze – To save their homeland, young Japanese became kamikaze pilots, who undertook suicide missions, crashing their planes with loaded explosives into American warships.

Pacifism – The Great Depression pushed for the side spread of pacifism, or opposition to all war, and disgust with the last war pushed government to seek peace at any price.

Winston Churchill – The British prime minister during WWII, he watch the Nazi threat get out of hand and turn to war.

Francisco Franco – In 1936, a right-wing general, Francisco France, led a revolt that touched off a bloody civil war.

Dwight Eisenhower – General Eisenhower was made the supreme Allied commander and he planned out the invasion of France.

Haile Selassie – The Emperor of Ethiopia who defended off the Italians after their attempt to invade and take command of Ethiopia

Harry Truman – He took over for president after the death of FDR and made the decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan.

Dunkirk – The British forces were able to rescue retreating allied troops and ferry them back to Britain from the beaches of Dunkirk and Ostend.

El Alamein – In Egypt, the British under General Bernard Montgomery finally stopped Rommel’s advance during the long, fierce Battle of El Alamein.

Guernica – To Nazi leaders, the attack on Guernica, a Spanish market town, was an “experiment” to see what their new planes could do.

Hiroshima – On August 6, 1945, an American plane dropped an atomic bomb on the midsized city of Hiroshima to end WWII.

Nagasaki - On August 6, 1945, an American plane dropped an atomic bomb on the midsized city of Hiroshima to end WWII.

Pearl Harbor – General Tojo ordered a surprise attack on the American fleet at Pearl Harbor. On Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese planes struck and destroyed 19 ships.

Operation Barbarossa – In June 1941, Hitler embarked on Operation Barbarossa – the conquest of the Soviet Union to gain more “living space” for Germany.

D-Day – The invasion of France by Allied troops, about 176,000 Allied troops were ferried across the English channel onto German territory.

Battle of Midway – The Allies won the first of many victories at the Battle of Midway, a Japanese island which served as an air strip.

Holocaust – Hitler and his supporters had devised plans for the “final solution of the Jewish problem” – the genocide, or deliberate destruction, of all European Jews.

Cold War rivals (which nations) - An ideological war between the U.S. and the USSR, the U.S. wanted to spread democracy to the world and the USSR wanted to spread communism.

Francisco Franco – In 1936, a right-wing general, Francisco France, led a revolt that touched off a bloody civil war.

Benito Mussolini – He was the Italian dictator who allied with Germany and Japan in hopes for an easy victory over the French.

Adolph Hitler – He was the German dictator who called for the invasion of all of Europe and the extermination of the Jews.

Tojo Hideki- General of Japan’s army wanted to conquer all of Asia for Japan. He called for the attack on Preal harbor and went to war with the United States.

Neville Chamberlin – The British prime minister who opposed another who with Germany and called for an appeasement.

Franklin Roosevelt – President who declared war on the Axis forces and served 3 terms before his sudden death.

Stalingrad – German troops surrounded the city of Stalingrad in hopes to capture it but were unsuccessful and were defeated by Russian troops.

Explain 2 reasons why the US used the atomic bomb against Japan – Truman was convinced that Japan would not surrender without an invasion and tensions between the U.S. and Russia influenced the attack.

Ch. 32
Acid rain – Gases from power plants and factories produced acid rain, a form of pollution in which toxic chemicals in the air come back to the earth as rain.

Culture shock – The western ways and ideology took the world by storm especially after WWII and it set the fashion trends and other ideals for the world.

Interdependence – Interdependence is the dependence of countries on goods, resources, and knowledge from other parts of the world.

Liberation theology – Liberation theology is the urge of the Church to take a more active role in opposing the social conditions that contributed to poverty.

Multinational Corporation – Multinational Corporations, enterprises with branches in many countries, have invested in the developing world.

Nonaligned – To avoid super power rivalry, many new nations chose to remain nonaligned, that is, not allied to either side in the Cold War.

Privatization – Debtor nations turned from socialism to privatization, selling off state-owned industries to private investors.

Terrorism – Terrorism is the deliberate use of random acts of violence, especially against civilians, to exact revenge or achieves political goals.

Political instability in Africa - Civil wars, military dictators, and insufficient funds were all factors in creating instability in African nations.

Developing countries – In developing countries civil wars, military dictators, and insufficient funds were all factors in creating instability.

Effects of Cold War – The Cold War caused Korea and Vietnam to separate into divide nations, which turned into a war, the Democratic versus the Communists.

Spread of American culture around the globe – American culture spread throughout the world rapidly after the Cold War and WWII.

Factories effect on environmental damage – New factories caused huge quantities of pollution and is eating up the Earth’s natural resources, which both are dangerous in the long run.

Modern technology – Technology has transformed life in the Western world, new ways of communication and transportation spurred and caused may nations to become wealthier.

Ch. 33
Détente – American and Soviet leaders promoted an era of détente or relaxation of tensions after the Cold War.

Deficit – Government spending and tax cuts greatly increased the national deficit, the gap between what a government spends and makes.

Dissident – Breazhnev rigorously suppressed dissidents, people who spoke out against the government.

Glasnost – Gorbachev launched a two-pronged effort at reform after the fall of the USSR; he called the first glasnost, or openness.

Welfare state – A major goal of leftist parties was to extend the welfare state-a government keeps most features of a capitalist economy but takes greater responsibility for the social and economic needs of its people.

Leonid - Leonid Brezhnev took over the Soviet Union and he rigorously suppressed people who spoke out against the government.

Charles de Gaulle – In 1958, de Gaulle set up the Fifth Republic; its constitution gave him, as president, great power over France.

Martin Luther King Jr. – Dr. King led many protests against the segregations between the whites and blacks in the United States.

Joseph McCarthy – McCarthy was an American senator who charged many Americans with harboring communist sympathies.

Margaret Thatcher – Led by Thatcher, the Conservative party denounced the welfare state as costly and inefficient and called for an “”enterprise culture.”

Perestroika – Gorbachev urged the reconstructing of government and economy called perestroika as his second initiative.
Service industry – A service industry is one that provides a service rather than a product that include health care, education, finance, and sales.

Welfare state – A major goal of leftist parties was to extend the welfare state-a government keeps most features of a capitalist economy but takes greater responsibility for the social and economic needs of its people.

Mikhail Gorbachev – Gorbachev took power of the Russian government after the collapse of the USSR. He launched two-pronged efforts at reforms, the first was glasnost and the second was called perestroika.

Helmut Kohl – West German chancellor Kohl was the architect of unity. He assured both the Soviet Union and the West that a united Germany would pose not threat to peace.

Nikita Krushchev – Nikita was the Soviet Union dictator who tried at reforms but failed and was replaced by Brezhnev after his death.

Josip Tito – Tito was a communist guerrilla leader who set up a communist government in Yugoslavia after WWII.

Lech Walesa - Walesa led an organized, independent trade union called Solidarity; the Polish government destroyed the Solidarity and Walesa was arrested.

Global economic competition - The result of the economy of the USSR was drastic and the economy went down hill until the Union collapsed.

Civil war in Yugoslavia – As communism diminished, nationalism began to tear Yugoslavia apart; the Serbs, Muslims, and Croats began to persecute each other and form separate countries.

American foreign policy during Cold War – The Americans would not support any country that is helping or aiding the Soviet Union

Warsaw Pact – The Soviet Union and other communist nations joined the Warsaw Pact and acted against to the western democracy.

NATO – The western democracies, led by the United States, formed the NATO. The NATO was joined by other democratic nations.

European Coal and Steel Community – This independent agency set prices and other regulated the coal and steel industries of member states such as France, Western Germany, and Italy.

Glasnost – Gorbachev launched a two-pronged effort at reform after the fall of the USSR; he called the first glasnost, or openness.

1973 oil crisis – In 1973, the West suffered an economic jolt when OPEC cut oil production and raised prices, and many factories and business had to shut down.

Berlin Wall as a symbol of Cold War – The Berlin Wall separated the Communist east and the Democratic west and was finally brought down in the 80s.

European Union – The European Union, also known as the Common Market, attempted to expand free trade.

Civil rights movement – Martin Luther King Jr. lead the fight against segregation in the United States, he used nonviolence to fight against the government.

"Ethnic cleansing" Bosnia – Serbs practiced “ethnic cleansing,” forcibly removing other ethnic groups form the areas they controlled.

Ch. 34
Asian tigers – The Asian Tigers included Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore. They are have strong economic ties and they all have a high GDP.

Commune – A typical commune included several villages, thousands of acres of land, and up to 25,000 people. Communes were an attempt to increase the output of agriculture.

Diet - The Diet was another phrase for the parliament of Japan. They had a constitution that took the power from the emperor and gave it to the parliament and the people.

Domino theory - The domino theory was a theory thought up the West, it stated that each communist country in Southeast Asia would conquer one another and so on.

Four Modernizations - Deng Xiaoping set goals to reach the four modernizations: emphasized agriculture, industry, science, and defense.

Gross domestic product – GCP refers to the total value of all goods and services produced by a nation. Japan chalked up huge jumps in GDP between 1950 and 1975.

Khmer Rouge - Khmer Rouge was a communist guerrilla group that took Cambodia by storm and slaughtered millions of people for the communist cause.

"Little Red Book" - The “Little Red Book” stated Mao’s principles and his thoughts on modernization.

Hong Kong – Hong Kong is one of the Asian Tigers that belongs to Britain, they were able to capture it in the Opium Wars.

Japan

Pacific Rim

Singapore

Vietnam

Mao Zedong

Four Modernizations

North Korea

South Korea

General MacArthur's military gov goals

Nationalist

Ho Chi Minh

Importance of Pacific Rim to Global Economy

Effect of American occupation of Japan post WWII

Communist Revolution

Cold War Countries (ie. China, N. Korea, N. Vietnam) elaborate on each.-

Ch. 35
Green Revolution
harijan
intifada
Ayatollah Khomeni
kibbutzim
Kurds
Gamal Abdel Nasser
Jawaharlal Nehru
harijan
hejab
ulama
Bangladesh
Beirut
West Bank
Pakistan
Palestine
Muslim and Hindu tension
Palestinian and Jewish conflict
Nasser
PLO
Water supply in Middle East

Ch. 36
Jomo Kenyatta
Nelson Mandela
Mixed economy
Julius Nyerere
Organizations of African Unity
Mobutu Sese Seko
SWAPO
ujamaa
ANC
FW, de Klerk
Mau Mau
Kwame Nkrumah
Ethnic conficts in Nigeria
Minority government in Rhodesia
African battleground countries during the Cold War.-
Algeria's battle for Independence
Zimbabwe's majority rule
Apartheid
Economic sanctions agianst S. Africa-
African urbanization
Weakening of African cultures
Colonial rule
Islam as a revolutionary force in Africa.-

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